Anthoz

2014 - Day 107: Light Box

"A New York State of Film."

Word.

#tff2014 (at Bow Tie Chelsea Cinemas)
Apr 17

2014 - Day 107: Light Box

"A New York State of Film."

Word.

#tff2014 (at Bow Tie Chelsea Cinemas)

Apr 17

delerium-and-dream:

mordicaifeed:

Career Day: Ilias Kyriazis’ Sandman & The Endless — Superhero Style!

Ahhh I love all of these!

(via agrownupgeekgirl)

Apr 17

Showin’ some photo-set love for Tanya Naghten. Again. Again.

Word.

Apr 17

Showin’ some photo-set love for Tanya Naghten. Again.

Word.

"In 1979, when the minimum wage was $2.90, a hard-working student with a minimum-wage job could earn enough in one day (8.44 hours) to pay for one academic credit hour. If a standard course load for one semester consisted of maybe 12 credit hours, the semester’s tuition could be covered by just over two weeks of full-time minimum wage work—or a month of part-time work. A summer spent scooping ice cream or flipping burgers could pay for an MSU education. The cost of an MSU credit hour has multiplied since 1979. So has the federal minimum wage. But today, it takes 60 hours of minimum-wage work to pay off a single credit hour, which was priced at $428.75 for the fall semester."

-

The Myth of Working Your Way Through College - Svati Kirsten Narula - The Atlantic (via infoneer-pulse)

$478 for in-state upperclassmen

(via rgr-pop)

i feel like this study deserves an article written about it that ends pushing for cheaper tuition costs rather than one that ends encouraging students to major in things that make money

(via katydidnot)

Reblogged for comment ^

(via sassyfrasscircus)

(via real-lifewonderwoman)

Apr 17
thatgirlcanlift:

crossfitters:

Revie Schulz.

Did these for the first time the other day with a 12kg lol almost lost my arm but I like em.
Apr 17

thatgirlcanlift:

crossfitters:

Revie Schulz.

Did these for the first time the other day with a 12kg lol almost lost my arm but I like em.

(via real-lifewonderwoman)

Apr 17

kurtiswiebe:

Happy Valentine’s day from team Rat Queens!

Like what you see? Follow the Facebook page. 

www.facebook.com/ratqueens

Also, Rat Queens is on sale on Comixology for the next 3 days!

http://www.comixology.com/Image-Leading-Ladies/page/753

Apr 17

We’re the Rat Queens!

(Source: nthmetal)

Apr 17

tessfowler:

Rat Queens fan art by Tess Fowler

Rat Queens is an epic comic created by Kurtis J. Wiebe and Roc Upchurch. 

You MUST read it. No exaggeration when I promise you that you’ll love it.

Apr 16

kurtiswiebe:

Rat Queens #6 Preview! We’re back in action May 7th with our brand new arc “The Far Reaching Tentacles of N’Rygoth. Prepare your feels, we’re diving deep into what makes these women who they are. 

Still lots of jokes.

100% more feels.

(via johnnyrocwell)

"If you have love you don’t need to have anything else; and if you don’t have it, it doesn’t matter much what else you have."

- Sir James M. Barrie (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

Apr 16
Apr 16

image-of-you-and-i:

The Beatles gathered at EMI Studios (3 Abbey Rd, London) on the morning of Friday 8th August 1969 for one of the most famous photo shoots of their career. Photographer Ian Macmillan took the famous image that adorned their last-recorded album, Abbey Road. 

Prior to the shoot, Paul McCartney had sketched his ideas for the cover, to which Macmillan added a more detailed illustration. (image 1)

A policeman held the traffic as Macmillan, from a stepladder positioned in the middle of the road, took six shots as the group walked across the zebra crossing just outside the studio.

(via elliotwriella)

phoenixfireashes:

I should start taking pics of good stuff I see on bathroom walls too. Some of the stuff is pretty deep and really makes me think.
Apr 16

phoenixfireashes:

I should start taking pics of good stuff I see on bathroom walls too. Some of the stuff is pretty deep and really makes me think.

(Source: reassures)

neurosciencestuff:

Study Examines Vitamin D Deficiency and Cognition Relationship
Vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in older adults, but there isn’t a lot of conclusive research into whether there’s a relationship between the two.
A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center published online ahead of print this month in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society enhances the existing literature on the subject.
“This study provides increasing evidence that suggests there is an association between low vitamin D levels and cognitive decline over time,” said lead author Valerie Wilson, M.D., assistant professor of geriatrics at Wake Forest Baptist. “Although this study cannot establish a direct cause and effect relationship, it would have a huge public health implication if vitamin D supplementation could be shown to improve cognitive performance over time because deficiency is so common in the population.”
Wilson and colleagues were interested in the association between vitamin D levels and cognitive function over time in older adults. They used data from the Health, Aging and Body composition (Health ABC) study to look at the relationship. The researchers looked at 2,777 well-functioning adults aged 70 to 79 whose cognitive function was measured at the study’s onset and again four years later. Vitamin D levels were measured at the 12-month follow-up visit.
The Health ABC study cohort consists of 3,075 Medicare-eligible, white and black, well-functioning, community-dwelling older adults who were recruited between April 1997 and June 1998 from Pittsburgh, Pa., and Memphis, Tenn.
“With just the baseline observational data, you can’t conclude that low vitamin D causes cognitive decline. When we looked four years down the road, low vitamin D was associated with worse cognitive performance on one of the two cognitive tests used,” Wilson said. “It is interesting that there is this association and ultimately the next question is whether or not supplementing vitamin D would improve cognitive function over time.”
Wilson said randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent cognitive decline and definitively establish a causal relationship.
“Doctors need this information to make well-supported recommendations to their patients,” Wilson said. “Further research is also needed to evaluate whether specific cognitive domains, such as memory versus concentration, are especially sensitive to low vitamin D levels.”
Apr 16

neurosciencestuff:

Study Examines Vitamin D Deficiency and Cognition Relationship

Vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in older adults, but there isn’t a lot of conclusive research into whether there’s a relationship between the two.

A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center published online ahead of print this month in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society enhances the existing literature on the subject.

“This study provides increasing evidence that suggests there is an association between low vitamin D levels and cognitive decline over time,” said lead author Valerie Wilson, M.D., assistant professor of geriatrics at Wake Forest Baptist. “Although this study cannot establish a direct cause and effect relationship, it would have a huge public health implication if vitamin D supplementation could be shown to improve cognitive performance over time because deficiency is so common in the population.”

Wilson and colleagues were interested in the association between vitamin D levels and cognitive function over time in older adults. They used data from the Health, Aging and Body composition (Health ABC) study to look at the relationship. The researchers looked at 2,777 well-functioning adults aged 70 to 79 whose cognitive function was measured at the study’s onset and again four years later. Vitamin D levels were measured at the 12-month follow-up visit.

The Health ABC study cohort consists of 3,075 Medicare-eligible, white and black, well-functioning, community-dwelling older adults who were recruited between April 1997 and June 1998 from Pittsburgh, Pa., and Memphis, Tenn.

“With just the baseline observational data, you can’t conclude that low vitamin D causes cognitive decline. When we looked four years down the road, low vitamin D was associated with worse cognitive performance on one of the two cognitive tests used,” Wilson said. “It is interesting that there is this association and ultimately the next question is whether or not supplementing vitamin D would improve cognitive function over time.”

Wilson said randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent cognitive decline and definitively establish a causal relationship.

“Doctors need this information to make well-supported recommendations to their patients,” Wilson said. “Further research is also needed to evaluate whether specific cognitive domains, such as memory versus concentration, are especially sensitive to low vitamin D levels.”

(via phoenixfireashes)

Apr 16

yieldforunicorns:

lets play a game called “credit the artist”

makanidotdot

(Source: benderdj, via agrownupgeekgirl)